John Magoun

Project Management Work

At Explorations Academy H.S. I used my full range of management and programming skills to handle the administrative side of teaching.

01 - Gradebook, Explorations Academy H.S., 2010.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Gradebook for Economics, Section 01

MS-Excel spreadsheet

I kept all my gradebooks as Excel files, and printed them out weekly for reference while teaching in class.

Excel's features include dynamic formatting, where the colors of the cells can change based on their values. And of course one can filter and sort the lists as needed.

This allowed me to highlight students' performance and use the gradebook to differentiate my instruction and classroom management. For instance, the red, black, pink and yellow coloring in the right hand columns picks out students that are at risk of failing either due to poor attendance, poor work, or both.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I used my full range of management and programming skills to handle the administrative side of teaching.

02 - Bonus Bucks, Explorations Academy H.S., 2010.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Bonus Bucks incentive coupons

MS-Word text merge report

Students with zero or minimal behavior and lateness issues were rewarded publically and weekly with "Monopoly Money" that boosted the Class Participation component of their grade, and that they could redeem at the end of the semester for (cheap) prizes.

The back side, detailing their classroom behavior, were printed in Word by a syntactically-programmed mailmerge with data from the Excel gradebook (see above).

Similar technology allowed me to produce detailed and personalized student progress reports to parents and the administration.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I used my full range of management and programming skills to handle the administrative side of teaching.

03 - Project Grading Rubric, Explorations Academy H.S., 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Project Grading Rubric for Government class

MS-Excel spreadsheet

I used Performance-Based Assessments, or projects, quite a lot in my senior-year courses in Economics and Government.

The rubrics for these projects were detailed, to maximize the students' chances of getting credit for partial performance. I programmed the grade sheets for the projects to reflect the weight of the various components.

As shown here, I published these to the students at the end of the projects to help them see the importance of attention to detail. This list of projects is sorted with the highest grades at the bottom; note the higher percentage of "green" scores there versus the poorer yellows and reds.

The students' names were replaced by their student ID numbers, to respect their privacy - which I could do by linking to my Excel gradebook. Likewise, the constantly-updated project grades were linked back to the semester gradebook.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I used my full range of management and programming skills to handle the administrative side of teaching.

04 - Unit Planning and Academic Calendar, Explorations Academy H.S., 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Unit Plans

MS-Excel spreadsheet

This file did not use much programming. But Excel's grid is ideal for organizing a calendar. Here I kept the school's academic schedule in parallel with the week-to-week unit plans for my two courses. This allowed me to see the intersection of holidays, grading periods, etc. with the teaching and testing days available for each unit.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I worked for a semester as the school's Data Specialist. My job was to use the city DoE's ARIS database, Regents test scores, and other sources to discover global patterns of student performance and teachers' effectiveness. The goal of the initiative was to use available data to help the faculty and administration design more effective instructional policies and curriculum guidelines.

05 - "A Tale of Two Tests": Report on Social Studies Regents Test scores, Explorations Academy H.S., June 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

U.S. and Global History Regents: Score Distribution

Data analysis and Slide presentation.

This presentation compared the performance of our students on the two Social Studies Regents Tests. To introduce the problem I plotted the results for each test as a simple progression.

The data point for each student is available, but the primary message comes from the coloring and the illustrations: below 64 is a fail, requiring Summer School remediation; 65-74 is a bare pass, allowing graduation; above 75 indicates a student is prepared for college level work in the subject.

By illustrating and coloring both charts with identical keys, I helped the audience understand the basic question of the presentation: why are so many more students failing the Global test?

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I worked for a semester as the school's Data Specialist. My job was to use the city DoE's ARIS database, Regents test scores, and other sources to discover global patterns of student performance and teachers' effectiveness. The goal of the initiative was to use available data to help the faculty and administration design more effective instructional policies and curriculum guidelines.

06 - "A Tale of Two Tests": Report on Social Studies Regents Test scores, Explorations Academy H.S., June 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

U.S. and Global History Regents: Attendance vs. Scores

Data analysis and Slide presentation.

Part of the inquiry asked the obvious question of whether attendance was a factor in the difference between the two tests.

Using the student's ID's, I linked the Regents Test scores to the ARIS database, and plotted student attendance against test success. I then used MS-Excel's graphing features to create a simple trend line.

What I uncovered was that attendance alone did not seem to explain the test results. The U.S. history classes did show a general correlation, but the Global history classes did not.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I worked for a semester as the school's Data Specialist. My job was to use the city DoE's ARIS database, Regents test scores, and other sources to discover global patterns of student performance and teachers' effectiveness. The goal of the initiative was to use available data to help the faculty and administration design more effective instructional policies and curriculum guidelines.

07 - Report on ELA (English) Regents, Explorations Academy H.S., April 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

ELA Regents: Performance by test sector

Data analysis

The English faculty asked me to break their students' overall scores down by the various sectors of the test, to see if any unusual patterns of strength and weakness would appear.

For the four sectors, I sorted the students by their overall test score, and added a moving average trend line to help highlight any general peaks and valleys.

Although the data was low-contrast, it was still apparent from the charts that several students on the left (low-scoring) side had more extreme performance differentials between sectors than the high-scoring students did. This helped the teachers target those students for remedial work in specific sectors.

>

At Explorations Academy H.S. I worked for a semester as the school's Data Specialist. My job was to use the city DoE's ARIS database, Regents test scores, and other sources to discover global patterns of student performance and teachers' effectiveness. The goal of the initiative was to use available data to help the faculty and administration design more effective instructional policies and curriculum guidelines.

08 - Scholarship Report, Marking Period 1, Explorations Academy H.S., April 2009.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Scholarship Report: grading patterns by department and by individual faculty

Data analysis and Slide presentation

After grades were submitted for the first Marking Period of three, I broke the data down by teacher instead of by student.

The first slide is the summary for the school by department. The highest grades are at the bottom, progressing up by darker tones to black, which shows failing grades. For reasons which can be explored, the Science department fails the fewest students, while the Math department gives the most A's.

The second slide breaks the first down by teacher, using the same basic design. Individual teachers' grading policies can be opened up for discussion and coordination by the faculty as a whole.

>

First Fax is a premium event diary for the buy-side institutional investment community. Its product is the collection and organization of timely listings of events that are of interest to subscribers. As editor and database manager, I upgraded its mode of operation from handwritten entries in notebooks to a complex interlinked set of programmed Excel spreadsheets. As a result, the newsletter was able to increase its scope and depth of event coverage by a factor of six, keeping it competitive in a fast-changing technological environment.

09 - Database Management, First Fax, 2000-07.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

First Fax front page

Prepared for publication using Quark Xpress

A typical issue from 2009 is excerpted here. The listings are tightly packed and abbreviated as much as possible. Upcoming events are collected by the research analysts from a month to an hour before publication.

My core tasks were to get an almost unmanageably large amount of time-sensitive information under better control, and to streamline the rote aspects of the publication process wherever possible.

>

First Fax is a premium event diary for the buy-side institutional investment community. Its product is the collection and organization of timely listings of events that are of interest to subscribers. As editor and database manager, I upgraded its mode of operation from handwritten entries in notebooks to a complex interlinked set of programmed Excel spreadsheets. As a result, the newsletter was able to increase its scope and depth of event coverage by a factor of six, keeping it competitive in a fast-changing technological environment.

10 - Database Management, First Fax, 2000-07.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

First Fax Earnings Reports database

MS-Excel spreadsheet

Public companies report their earnings four times a year. These reports are of extreme interest to the investment community.

I built this spreadsheet of earnings reports and conference call listings to allow the research analysts to enter and sort a large amount of information more efficiently. It was also linked to several other databases: long-term information on the companies' names, locations, and contacts; time zones to facilitate efficient calling to Europe and from east to west coasts; and S&P listings to highlight the more important companies.

Finally, I programmed the spreadsheet to build an exportable text list for the nightly publication. This included Quark's control codes, enabling a very rapid cut-and-paste process.

>

First Fax is a premium event diary for the buy-side institutional investment community. Its product is the collection and organization of timely listings of events that are of interest to subscribers. As editor and database manager, I upgraded its mode of operation from handwritten entries in notebooks to a complex interlinked set of programmed Excel spreadsheets. As a result, the newsletter was able to increase its scope and depth of event coverage by a factor of six, keeping it competitive in a fast-changing technological environment.

11 - Database Management, First Fax, 2000-07.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

First Fax Conferences database

MS-Excel spreadsheet

As with the earnings reports (above), industry conferences where analysts and companies exchange information are of interest to the subscribers.

Again, the spreadsheet was not just an ordered list for data entry and recovery. As seen in the detail at right ("Phrase"), I programmed complex parsing text-based formulas to assemble the information into a ready-to-publish text format, for a rapid nightly transition from Excel to Quark.

>

First Fax is a premium event diary for the buy-side institutional investment community. Its product is the collection and organization of timely listings of events that are of interest to subscribers. As editor and database manager, I upgraded its mode of operation from handwritten entries in notebooks to a complex interlinked set of programmed Excel spreadsheets. As a result, the newsletter was able to increase its scope and depth of event coverage by a factor of six, keeping it competitive in a fast-changing technological environment.

12 - Database Management, First Fax, 2000-07.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

First Fax subscribers database

MS-Access database

For the back office side of operations, I programmed an Access database of our subscribers to enable a tighter control over the income stream. The key report was the fax and email address list that could be uploaded to the commercial service that broadcast the product. Other reports were itemized invoices for quarterly billing, and summaries for the accountant.

>

At THinc Design, a cutting-edge exhibit design firm created by Tom Hennes, I was a staff Project Manager on several high-tech museum-quality exhibits.

13 - AT&T at Disneyland Innoventions, THinc Design, 1998.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Exhibit Breakdown

MS-Word document

Disney gave THinc a design-build contract to install an AT&T sponsored exhibit on "Distance Education" at Disneyland's new Innoventions pavilion. I was the Project Manager, working directly under Tom Hennes, THinc's principal.

Along with managing the $4 million budget for the highly interactive and computerized exhibit, I scheduled and attended all meetings and calls, traveled to Los Angeles to interview vendors and to supervise the final installation, and coordinated all design and construction departments. I created the Exhibit Breakdown (at left) document as the project bible, repeatedly updating and circulating it to all parties as the design evolved.

>

At THinc Design, a cutting-edge exhibit design firm created by Tom Hennes, I was a staff Project Manager on several high-tech museum-quality exhibits.

14 - Madame Tussauds NYC, THinc Design, 1999.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Building and Power Report

MS-Word document

Madame Tussauds was preparing to open a new museum in Times Square, New York. THinc contracted to design an immersive "New York rooftop" environment with a  multimedia entertainment program to introduce guests to the Tussauds experience.

As Project Manager at this early phase, I coordinated the proposed designs and budgets, interviewed potential staff and vendors, and scouted the location. Since the museum was new construction in a skyscraper building, the space was being custom built for our environment. I prepared an extensive Building and Power Report (at left) for the client's architects and engineers, which laid out the physical and infrastructure requirements of the proposed exhibit.

>

At THinc Design, a cutting-edge exhibit design firm created by Tom Hennes, I was a staff Project Manager on several high-tech museum-quality exhibits.

15 - New England Aquarium East Wing, THinc Design, 1999.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Concept Design Interpretive Plan: Appendices on exhibits and habitats

Filemaker Pro database report

THinc was the exhibit designer for a major expansion of the New England Aquarium in Boston.

Along with general tasks of coordinating the design process, I prepared two databases in the Mac application Filemaker Pro. One tracked the exhibits' capabilities and technical requirements, to anticipate the bidding phase still to come; and one (at left) traced the exhibits' live animal component, to allow us to communicate with the Aquarium's curators.

For the deliverable Interpretive Plan at the end of the Concept Design stage, I programmed these databases to generate highly formatted reports that could be included directly in the published report as appendices.

>

At THinc Design, a cutting-edge exhibit design firm created by Tom Hennes, I was a staff Project Manager on several high-tech museum-quality exhibits.

16 - THinc database of Interactive Exhibit designs and costs, THinc Design, 2000.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Exhibit cost reference book

Filemaker Pro database report

While working as Project Manager at THinc, I realized the company was not organizing its institutional memory to best advantage. The costs and solutions of previous exhibits were scattered throughout the various archival files and in the principal's memory.

To help managers and designers find comparable costs going forward, I assembled and databased all of THinc's interactive exhibit designs. Most valuable were the data on costs, both proposed and as-built. At left is the catalogue's entry on the Telepresence exhibit at Disneyland, also referred to in item 13 above.

>

While working as Art Director on the soap operas Loving, The City and All My Children from 1993 to 1997, I took charge of managing the shows' stock of active sets and scenic elements. Working closely with the production designer, Boyd Dumrose, I photographed, labeled, and catalogued all the items in the warehouse. I promoted the practice of referring to them on ground plans and work orders by systematic codes rather than by the sets they were temporarily assigned to. Finally, I began automating the system with an MS-Access database that could record and generate the assembly orders for the shops and crews, which were traditionally written by hand.

17 - 'Stock Scenery for ABC Daytime: Scenic Design and Management for the 21st Century', Report to ABC management, 1997.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

 

Set Plans

MS-Word document

Pending transition to computer-aided drafting and design, I set as high a standard as I could for drawing our set plans with clarity and system.

This illustration highlights some of the key features of my system: exact illustration of joints, permanent coding of all flats and props, and correlation of the coding with a Set Composition work order. These plans were used successfully by the Warehouse, Trucking, Scene Shops, and the Stage Carpenter, Lighting, and Prop Crews, without designer supervision.

The primary benefits were savings in cost due to elimination of redundant elements or duplicate construction, and higher production efficiency due to fewer lost or mislaid items.

>

While working as Art Director on the soap operas Loving, The City and All My Children from 1993 to 1997, I was in charge of managing the shows' stock of active sets and scenic elements. Working closely with the production designer, Boyd Dumrose, I photographed, labeled, and catalogued all the items in the warehouse. I promoted the practice of referring to them on ground plans and work orders by systematic codes rather than by the sets they were temporarily assigned to. Finally, I began automating the system with an MS-Access database that could record and generate the assembly orders for the shops and crews, which were traditionally written by hand.

18 - 'Stock Scenery for ABC Daytime: Scenic Design and Management for the 21st Century', Report to ABC management, 1997.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Set Composition

MS-Word document

As noted above, the Set Composition was a written Shipping Order for assembling a set in the shop or, more rarely, directly on stage. From the designer's point of view, it clarified where all the physical pieces needed to create a set were actually going to come from.

This illustrates a major difference between managing a stock repertory of existing scenery for a soap opera, and simply drafting a set of plans for a shop to build from scratch, as is done in other areas of set design.

I worked ceaselessly to rationalize the notation and naming of scenic elements. I was looking forward to a computerization of the process that never actually came to be while I worked at ABC Daytime.

>

While working as Art Director on the soap operas Loving, The City and All My Children from 1993 to 1997, I was in charge of managing the shows' stock of active sets and scenic elements. Working closely with the production designer, Boyd Dumrose, I photographed, labeled, and catalogued all the items in the warehouse. I promoted the practice of referring to them on ground plans and work orders by systematic codes rather than by the sets they were temporarily assigned to. Finally, I began automating the system with an MS-Access database that could record and generate the assembly orders for the shops and crews, which were traditionally written by hand.

19 - 'Stock Scenery for ABC Daytime: Scenic Design and Management for the 21st Century', Report to ABC management, 1997.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

Stock Door Chart

MS-Word document

Like maps, handmade large-scale wall charts can offer advantages to office work that networked monitors have not yet achieved. After I made and labeled a grid of miniature images of all the Window and Door flats that were in the warehouse, two or three designers could view and discuss the entire inventory of stock items at once, without scrolling or flipping through screens or books.

>

While working as Art Director on the soap operas Loving, The City and All My Children from 1993 to 1997, I took charge of managing the shows' stock of active sets and scenic elements. Working closely with the production designer, Boyd Dumrose, I photographed, labeled, and catalogued all the items in the warehouse. I promoted the practice of referring to them on ground plans and work orders by systematic codes rather than by the sets they were temporarily assigned to. Finally, I began automating the system with an MS-Access database that could record and generate the assembly orders for the shops and crews, which were traditionally written by hand.

20 - 'Stock Scenery for ABC Daytime: Scenic Design and Management for the 21st Century', Report to ABC management, 1997.

Back to:

 

Index

 

Home

 

Stock Props

MS-Word document

The Prop collection of a Soap Opera is equivalent to the inventory of a mid-size antiques shop. The warehouse floors are jammed with bedsteads, draperies, and diner stools, in between shelves and shelves of dishware, telephones, and cheap framed prints that look like oils on camera.

When I started work as assistant designer on Loving, the props were catalogued only in the heads of the designer and the prop crew. I began taking color photos and dimensions of every piece that passed through the studio. This information went onto xeroxed card-sized file sheets, which in turn were organized in a binder. As with all other items in the scenic area, I gave each prop a numeric code for ongoing reference. As always, I hoped eventually to database this information on a computer.

 

All images, writing, and commentary on this page are the property of John Magoun.  All work may not be reproduced without permission. This page last updated: June 2012