How to Skin and cook a Rabbit

By Lawrence Scott and Gerry Noterey

This may be new to many people, but for some eating Rabbit was and is a regular food source.

Here you will learn how to skin and prepare a Rabbit for cooking.

The method of cooking chosen is the 'Camp Oven' used on top of the coals.

First of all you need a freshly trapped Rabbit. Be sure to trap just before sundown and/or just before sunup.

Do the right thing for the animal and check the traps regularly. Do not leave traps overnight as there is no point in making a trapped animal suffer more than is necessary. Check one hour after you place the traps and each hour until you trap a Rabbit or remove the trap.

 

  

 

Here we have one freshly trapped Rabbit.

Check the eyes, if they appear milky then discard the Rabbit as it is probably suffering from a disease.

 

First of all 'pinch' the skin at the loose part in lower belly. Cut a small hole with a sharp knife being careful not to puncture the stomach lining. (This can also be done in the center of the back).

 

  

  

 

Pull apart the skin and tear or cut all the way around the Rabbit.

 

Next, pull the skin very hard both ways until the front and back legs are free of the skin

 
 

  

 

Then cut of the head. Snap the lower part of all four legs to remove the feet.

 

Cut through the groin to remove waste tube. cut a 'V' into flesh where tails joins to remove the tail.

 
 

  

 

Being careful not to cut into the intestines, cut the stomach lining and remove all the innards.

 

Check internal organs (especially the liver) for signs of white patches or spots.

If found to have these patches/spots, then discard the Rabbit.

 

  

Be sure it is nice and clean inside.

Here we have one clean and healthy Rabbit for the cooking pot.

 

To improve the taste and texture, soak the Rabbit in a salt water solution for 6 hours or overnight before cooking.






 
Adapted from http://www.australianoutdoors.com/howtoskinrabbit.htm without permission for purposes of discussion on TheOneRing.net, October 2005.